Senior Correspondent, Sudan and South Sudan
Ulf's Feed
Jul 31, 2012

Eight killed during price protests in Sudan’s Darfur

KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Eight people were killed during a protest against rising prices in Sudan’s western Darfur region on Tuesday, the worst violence since tough austerity measures were imposed last month, police said.

Activists accused the police of using live ammunition to control the biggest anti-government protest since President Omar Hassan al-Bashir announced a cut in fuel subsidies and other austerity measures.

Jul 31, 2012

Price protest leaves six dead in Sudan’s Darfur

KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Six people were killed during a protest against rising prices in Sudan’s western Darfur region on Tuesday, the worst violence since tough austerity measures were imposed last month, an official said.

Activists accused the police of firing live ammunition at the biggest anti-government protest since President Omar Hassan al-Bashir announced a cut in fuel subsidies and other austerity measures.

Jul 22, 2012

Sudan wants South Sudan deal but pins impasse on Juba

KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Sudan wants to settle all its differences with South Sudan through talks, but sees little hope of a swift resolution while it believes Juba is backing rebels that threaten its territorial integrity, a senior ruling party official said on Sunday.

The African neighbors came close to a war when border fighting escalated in April, the worst violence since South Sudan split off and declared its independence a year ago under a 2005 agreement that ended decades of civil war.

Jul 22, 2012

Sudan fuel subsidy not fully lifted until end 2013

KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Sudan will not fully remove fuel subsidies until the end of 2013 since austerity measures worth 7 billion Sudanese pounds ($1.5 billion) are sufficient to turn around the ailing economy, a senior ruling party official said on Sunday.

The Arab African country is struggling with a worsening economic crisis after losing much of its oil wealth – the main source for revenues and dollars needed for imports – when South Sudan became independent last year.

Jul 19, 2012

Sudan’s currency hits low before Ramadan, stokes dissent

KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Sudan’s currency fell close to its historical low against the dollar as demand for imported food surged before the holy Muslim month of Ramadan, driving up prices and fuelling anger over a severe economic crisis.

President Omar Hassan al-Bashir, in power since 1989, has avoided an “Arab spring” but an austerity programme that included scaling back fuel subsidies sparked small-scale protests four weeks ago.

Jul 18, 2012

Gold last hope for Sudan to avert economic collapse

KHARTOUM, July 18 (Reuters) – In his office in Khartoum’s
gold market, central bank sales agent Mohamed Adam sips tea and
watches while his staff load bundles of cash worth tens of
thousands of dollars from the safe into four boxes.

The government will use these piles of Sudanese pounds to
purchase gold, which it plans to sell for the dollars needed to
pay for imports of food and other essentials.

Jul 12, 2012

Special Report: A radio jock tests freedom’s limits in new nation

JUBA (Reuters) – Radio journalist Mading Ngor was firing off sentences like machine gun rounds.

South Sudanese troops had occupied a disputed region across the country’s border with arch foe Sudan. President Salva Kiir declared the army would not withdraw. The ruling party staged marches to prepare the people for war.

Jun 13, 2012

Feature: Sudanese journalists stymied by “red lines” and raids

KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Veteran Sudanese journalist Mahjoub Mohamed Saleh says he cannot remember a time when there were so many “red lines” – invisible boundaries that the media crosses at its peril.

“You don’t know what the red lines are,” said Saleh, who started his career in 1949 when Britain still ruled Sudan and is now editor of Sudan’s oldest newspaper, Al-Ayam. “Sometimes you are told ‘don’t publish this’ but they (the red lines) keep moving.”

Jun 13, 2012

Sudanese journalists stymied by “red lines” and raids

KHARTOUM, June 13 (Reuters) – Veteran Sudanese journalist
Mahjoub Mohamed Saleh says he cannot remember a time when there
were so many “red lines” – invisible boundaries that the media
crosses at its peril.

“You don’t know what the red lines are,” said Saleh, who
started his career in 1949 when Britain still ruled Sudan and is
now editor of Sudan’s oldest newspaper, Al-Ayam. “Sometimes you
are told ‘don’t publish this’ but they (the red lines) keep
moving.”

Jun 13, 2012

Sudan faces test of popular discontent over fuel prices

KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Sudan, after avoiding the “Arab Spring” protests which swept through the Middle East, is about to face its first real test of popular discontent as it prepares to remove fuel subsidies.

With Sudan already suffering from a severe economic crisis since losing much of its oil production – the lifeline of the economy – when South Sudan became independent in July, ordinary people say that they can’t cope with further price rises.

    • About Ulf

      "I am Senior Correspondent, Saudi Arabia, covering from the Saudi capital Riyadh political, economic and social news and in-depth analyses from the world's top oil exporter and biggest Arab economy. I have also reported for Reuters from Kuwait, Yemen and Iraq."
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