Una's Feed
Apr 17, 2014
via Breakingviews

Asia push to in-house M&A forces advisers to adapt

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By Una Galani

The author is a Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own. 

Asian acquirers are taking their own advice when it comes to mergers and acquisitions – and global investment banks may have to adapt. From Singaporean sovereign investor Temasek to China’s CITIC, Asian companies are increasingly relying on internal talent to get deals done. The loss of business in an already tough market means big investment banks will have to work harder to prove their worth.

International banks have had a minimal role in two recent mega-deals. Temasek used its own mergers-and-acquisitions team to buy a 24.95 percent stake in AS Watson, the retail business of Li Ka-Shing’s Hutchison Whampoa, in March. Hong Kong-listed CITIC Pacific has named only its own subsidiary, and a related outfit, as advisers on its $36.5 billion acquisition of assets from its parent. Morgan Stanley worked on the deal, say people familiar with the situation, but isn’t mentioned in public documents.

Apr 17, 2014
via Breakingviews

Asia push to in-house M&A forces advisers to adapt

Photo

By Una Galani

The author is a Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own. 

Asian acquirers are taking their own advice when it comes to mergers and acquisitions – and global investment banks may have to adapt. From Singaporean sovereign investor Temasek to China’s CITIC, Asian companies are increasingly relying on internal talent to get deals done. The loss of business in an already tough market means big investment banks will have to work harder to prove their worth.

International banks have had a minimal role in two recent mega-deals. Temasek used its own mergers-and-acquisitions team to buy a 24.95 percent stake in AS Watson, the retail business of Li Ka-Shing’s Hutchison Whampoa, in March. Hong Kong-listed CITIC Pacific has named only its own subsidiary, and a related outfit, as advisers on its $36.5 billion acquisition of assets from its parent. Morgan Stanley worked on the deal, say people familiar with the situation, but isn’t mentioned in public documents.

Apr 17, 2014
via Breakingviews

CITIC’s $37 bln merger hints at SOE reform task

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By Una Galani

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist.  The opinions expressed are her own.

CITIC’s $37 billion merger has shed some light on the gargantuan task of reforming China’s state-owned enterprises. The giant conglomerate is merging its assets, which range from finance to football, into its smaller Hong Kong-listed subsidiary. The result combines listed stakes and a mish-mash of smaller businesses. But if all goes well, CITIC Pacific shareholders will get a profitable ringside seat in the cleanup.

Apr 17, 2014
via Breakingviews

CITIC’s $37 bln merger hints at SOE reform task

Photo

By Una Galani

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist.  The opinions expressed are her own.

CITIC’s $37 billion merger has shed some light on the gargantuan task of reforming China’s state-owned enterprises. The giant conglomerate is merging its assets, which range from finance to football, into its smaller Hong Kong-listed subsidiary. The result combines listed stakes and a mish-mash of smaller businesses. But if all goes well, CITIC Pacific shareholders will get a profitable ringside seat in the cleanup.

Apr 17, 2014
via Breakingviews

CITIC’s $37 bln merger hints at SOE reform task

Photo

By Una Galani

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist.  The opinions expressed are her own.

CITIC’s $37 billion merger has shed some light on the gargantuan task of reforming China’s state-owned enterprises. The giant conglomerate is merging its assets, which range from finance to football, into its smaller Hong Kong-listed subsidiary. The result combines listed stakes and a mish-mash of smaller businesses. But if all goes well, CITIC Pacific shareholders will get a profitable ringside seat in the cleanup.

Apr 16, 2014
via Breakingviews

Hong Kong needs to defend shareholder democracy

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By Una Galani and Peter Thal Larsen

The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own.

Hong Kong needs to make a stand for shareholder democracy. Alibaba’s decision to shift its giant stock market listing to the United States has sparked a debate about control of public companies in the former British colony. Hong Kong’s stock exchange, whose rules wouldn’t have permitted a plan to let Alibaba insiders nominate a majority of board directors, is preparing a public consultation on shareholder rights. But dumping the principle of “one share, one vote” would be a mistake.

Apr 16, 2014
via Breakingviews

Hong Kong needs to defend shareholder democracy

Photo

By Una Galani and Peter Thal Larsen

The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own.

Hong Kong needs to make a stand for shareholder democracy. Alibaba’s decision to shift its giant stock market listing to the United States has sparked a debate about control of public companies in the former British colony. Hong Kong’s stock exchange, whose rules wouldn’t have permitted a plan to let Alibaba insiders nominate a majority of board directors, is preparing a public consultation on shareholder rights. But dumping the principle of “one share, one vote” would be a mistake.

Apr 15, 2014
via Breakingviews

WH Group’s quick pork flip serves up meaty return

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By Una Galani 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

WH Group’s quick pork flip will serve up a meaty return. The Chinese pig producer hasn’t had much time to justify the 31 percent premium it paid for rival Smithfield less than seven months ago. Yet the planned relisting of the enlarged group in Hong Kong implies the value of the U.S. business has risen at least 21 percent.

Apr 15, 2014
via Breakingviews

WH Group’s quick pork flip serves up meaty return

Photo

By Una Galani 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

WH Group’s quick pork flip will serve up a meaty return. The Chinese pig producer hasn’t had much time to justify the 31 percent premium it paid for rival Smithfield less than seven months ago. Yet the planned relisting of the enlarged group in Hong Kong implies the value of the U.S. business has risen at least 21 percent.

Apr 2, 2014
via Breakingviews

Noble China joint venture still faces market test

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By Una Galani

The author is a Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Noble Group’s joint venture with China still faces a test from market forces. The Singapore trader is selling 51 percent of its agricultural business to a consortium led by state-backed COFCO for around $1.5 billion. China’s desire to control its food supply should guarantee volumes for the joint venture. But it’s less clear that will translate into healthy margins.

The precise size of the COFCO’s investment depends on how the unit, which processes everything from grains to coffee, performs over the next nine months. The final price will be equivalent of 1.15 times its book value in 2014. The headline price implies a valuation of $2.94 billion for the business, which accounted for 16 percent of Noble’s revenue last year.

    • About Una

      "Una Galani is Asia Corporate Finance Columnist of Reuters Breakingviews, based in Hong Kong. She spent three years in Dubai covering the region’s economies in the immediate aftermath of the Arab Spring. Previously, Una wrote on capital markets, mergers and acquisitions, and telecoms across Europe from London. She was commended in the category of Young Financial Journalist at the Harold Wincott Awards for 2009 after joining Breakingviews in 2006. Una read English Literature at Oxford. Follow Una on Twitter @ugalani"
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