Unstructured Finance

UF Weekend Reads

June 30, 2012

The heat is on all across the U.S. as we gear up for the 4th of July. And in Europe, the heat over the euro zone financial crisis seems to have abated for a day at least, judging by Friday’s big stock market reaction.

UF Weekend Reads

June 22, 2012

By Katya Wachtel

Yes, Germany and Greece have been in a war of words in the unfolding crisis over the latter’s membership in the euro zone, but this afternoon the two nations face off in a different (and far more entertaining) way: they go head-to-head in the European Championship quarterfinal.

Spain, not Greece, on the minds of many money managers

June 19, 2012

By Katya Wachtel

On Sunday, voters in Greeceā€™s parliamentary election gave market-watchers the result they wanted.

UF Weekend Reads

June 16, 2012

So there’s this election this Sunday in Greece and everyone–who follows the markets–is all excited. But at the end of the day, the main reason people in the markets are all up in arms is because they want to know who will get paid, in what order and most important–how much. Sadly, there’s too little focus on whether the right people/institutions are getting paid; let alone issues of social dignity and the quality of human existence. Guess that’s what the markets are all about, right?

UF Weekend Reads

May 19, 2012

The latest offerings by our Sam Forgione include a little Bridgewater, PIMCO and Jamie.

M&A wrap: EU crisis hits bank advisory fees

By Reuters Staff
December 22, 2011

Europe’s debt woes dragged worldwide investment banking income down this year, data showed, with fees on the continent slumping to the lowest quarterly level ever recorded and company listings and acquisitions grinding to a near halt. In Europe, fees raised since October from bonds, flotations and mergers and acquisitions stand at the lowest quarterly level ever recorded by the data providers. A stronger start to the year in areas such as mergers and acquisitions fizzled out, leaving investment banks’ overall haul of fees at $72.6 billion — down 8 percent on 2010.