Unstructured Finance

UF Weekend Reads

June 22, 2012

By Katya Wachtel

Yes, Germany and Greece have been in a war of words in the unfolding crisis over the latter’s membership in the euro zone, but this afternoon the two nations face off in a different (and far more entertaining) way: they go head-to-head in the European Championship quarterfinal.

Spain, not Greece, on the minds of many money managers

June 19, 2012

By Katya Wachtel

On Sunday, voters in Greece’s parliamentary election gave market-watchers the result they wanted.

UF Weekend Reads

June 16, 2012

So there’s this election this Sunday in Greece and everyone–who follows the markets–is all excited. But at the end of the day, the main reason people in the markets are all up in arms is because they want to know who will get paid, in what order and most important–how much. Sadly, there’s too little focus on whether the right people/institutions are getting paid; let alone issues of social dignity and the quality of human existence. Guess that’s what the markets are all about, right?

UF Weekend Reads

May 19, 2012

The latest offerings by our Sam Forgione include a little Bridgewater, PIMCO and Jamie.

UF’s Weekend Reads

March 2, 2012

We’re introducing a new feature on UF: a link to some weekend reads. Here is the first edition complied by Sam Forgione.

Gerard Fitzpatrick: Positive on global growth

March 29, 2011

Guest blogger Gerard Fitzpatrick is portfolio manager at Russell Investments, where he runs a $5 billion global bond fund.

Deals wrap: Conoco may double assets sale

March 23, 2011

ConocoPhillips, the third-largest U.S. oil company, said it might double its planned sale of less-desirable assets to $20 billion, with proceeds going to buy back stock.

Bond benchmarks go back to the drawing board

June 4, 2010

Olli RehnWith the euro zone facing a fiscal deficit nightmare, passive bond investors have been forced to think hard about whether following a simple market cap-weighted benchmark is a good idea. Traditional bond indices have the biggest weighting to the largest borrower — so investors end up lending more money to those desperate to borrow it.