Unstructured Finance

This summer, it’s the John Paulson show

Hedge fund manager John Paulson has shunned the limelight in recent years but in recent weeks it’s a different story, with the 57-year-old manager not only giving his first ever TV interview, he’s also set to take the stand in one of the most closely-watched trials in the country – the civil case against former Goldman Sachs trader Fabrice Tourre.

Tourre’s lawyer Sean Coffey said in a Manhattan federal court on Friday morning they intended to call Paulson to testify in the trial. The U.S District Judge overseeing the trial estimated Paulson would probably take the stand August 1.

Tourre is accused of misleading investors on a 2007 subprime mortgage deal that Paulson’s hedge fund, Paulson & Co, was betting against. Paulson’s firm had actually helped to select the securities that were packaged into the deal. The SEC says Tourre told investors that Paulson’s firm was investing in Abacus, suggesting he expected the price of the securities to rise, when actually the hedge fund was shorting it.

The shorting of the deal, known as Abacus 2007-AC1, was part of Paulson’s broader bet against the U.S. housing market in 2007, which earned him Wall Street fame, and billions of dollars. But after two banner years, Paulson’s returns nosedived, attracting a spotlight he neither wanted or sought out.

But 2013 is shaping up to be a better year for Paulson, with several of his biggest funds posting double-digit returns through June. And as his funds climb he is clearly more amenable to the media glare, doing his first ever TV interview this week as part of CNBC’s Delivering Alpha conference.  He talked housing; gold; M&A deals… He wasn’t asked about the Tourre trial.

Hedge funds vs. darts

By Matthew Goldstein

The Wall Street Journal used to run a feature in which some of its staffers would periodically pick stocks by throwing darts against a target. The idea was to see how many times stock picking by pure chance could outperform the picks of a bunch of experts.

The WSJ ended the popular feature several years ago but maybe it’s time from someone to bring it back and this time use darts to try to outperform some of top hedge funds managers. That’s because with the average hedge fund up about 1.2% during the first-half of the year, it would seem an investor on his or her own could do just as well picking stocks blindfolded.

Indeed, with the S&P500 up about 8 percent for the first half, the 3.7% gain for David Einhorn’s Greenlight Capital and the 3.9% gain for Dan Loeb’s Third Point don’t look so robust on second glance.

UF Weekend Reads

A dreary looking day in the NYC environs today, but that won’t overshadow birthday celebrations and other good news too cheer! A big shout to all UF members today. Oh, and fight for your right to party. Here then is Sam Forgione’s suggested readings.

 

From The New York Times:

A former managing director of Bain Capital has a telling beef with art-history majors.

From AR:

Hedge fund managers are still leaving their safety zones for emerging markets, even as John Paulson is recovering from his Sino-Forest bet, writes Jan Alexander.

The confession season

By Matthew Goldstein and Jennifer Ablan

The year is not yet over and already the confessions are starting to roll in from some of the biggest U.S. money managers.

Bill Gross, manager of the world’s biggest bond fund, sent out a “mea culpa” letter late Friday to his many mom-and-pop investors, saying he’s sorry for putting up such bad numbers this year. Mea culpas from Pimco’s guiding light and the self-styled “bond king” are rare, largely because his Total Return Fund has long been one of the industry’s top performers.

But this year has been a tough one for Gross, who guessed wrong by betting heavily against U.S. Treasuries, which have turned out to be one of the biggest out-performers of 2011. The fixed income guru, who helps manage more than $1.2 trillion at Pimco, wasn’t farsighted enough to foresee a flight to Treasuries prompted by events like the European debt crisis, the battle over the U.S. debt ceiling and the general anemic state of the global economy.

Welcome to Paulson-mart

By Matthew Goldstein

It’s been an ugly summer for hedge fund king John Paulson with two of his biggest funds down more than 25 percent. But what makes that poor performance all the more painful is how widespread it is being felt by wealthy individual investors around the globe.

Paulson’s flagship Advantage funds would appear to be exclusive terrain with a $10 million investment requirement. But that hefty entrance fee is something of a veneer because many of Paulson’s investors have gained entrance to his kingdom by plunking down as little as $100,000. That’s because Paulson’s Advantage funds are some of the most widely sold hedge fund portfolios on distribution platforms maintained by Wall Street firms, European banks and small investment advisory firms around the globe.

Paulson has built a powerful internal marketing force to make sure there is a steady stream of money from wealthy individual investors trying to get into his funds. This was one of the more surprising things my colleagues Jennifer Ablan, Svea Herbst-Bayliss and I found when we began taking a close look at Paulson’s problems this year.

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