War College

from The Great Debate:

Can NATO still put up a fight against Russia?

March 3, 2016

After the Soviet Union fell, NATO expanded. It also lost its main purpose: taking on that same Soviet Union.

from The Great Debate:

Podcast: Why closing Gitmo isn’t an open-and-shut case

February 26, 2016

President Barack Obama laid out a plan to close the Guantanamo Bay prison this week, where terror suspects are being held indefinitely. The 21 page document he sent to Congress calls for the transfer, imprisonment and trial by military commission of the remaining 91 detainees.

from The Great Debate:

Is Syrian war partly an ad for Russian arms sales?

February 18, 2016

Russia has gone to great pains to display its refurbished and modern weaponry the last few years. First in Georgia, then in Ukraine and now in Syria. Pundits, journalists and bloggers have marveled at how far Moscow’s military has come after the decade of decay following the collapse of the Soviet Union.

from The Great Debate:

How Garry Kasparov sees the chess match between Russia and the West

February 10, 2016

Garry Kasparov, a Russian opposition leader who was ranked as the world's best chess player for most of 20 years, has a problem with the West’s response to Vladimir Putin and warns of the dangers of Russia's global influence. The title of his new book – Winter Is Coming – is a conscious play on the famous Game of Thrones TV and book series and the sense of darkness stalking the world.

from The Great Debate:

Podcast: Surprising changes underway for Israel’s army

February 5, 2016
PARTICIPANTS: Jason Fields, Matthew Gault, Noga Tarnopolsky

Israel’s defense forces are widely regarded to be among the world’s elite. Their training methods are copied by other militaries, actions taken by their soldiers and pilots are legendary. The Raid on Entebbe, the Six Day War, the 1981 air strike that took out a nuclear reactor under construction in Iraq.

from The Great Debate:

How hot will the Saudi-Iran conflict get?

January 28, 2016
PARTICIPANTS: Jason Fields, Matthew Gault, Murtaza Hussain

Saudi Arabia executes a cleric who is a member of the Saudi Shi’ite minority. Iran’s government, which sees itself as the leader of the Shi’ite world, doesn’t work very hard to stop an attack on the Saudi Embassy in Tehran that follows the execution. Saudi Arabia closes its embassy and tensions between the two nations, which had been growing for years, hit a new high.

from The Great Debate:

Oil’s long good-bye and what comes next

January 21, 2016
Participants: Jason Fields, Matthew Gault, Agnia Grigas

Since the breakup of the Soviet Union, Russia has used natural gas as a weapon against Ukraine and Europe as a whole. Threatening to turn shut off the pipes as the weather turns cold is a pretty effective way to influence foreign policy.

from The Great Debate:

The Exchange: Garry Kasparov forecasts bloody regime change in Russia

January 20, 2016

Garry Kasparov, a Russian opposition leader who was ranked as the world's best chess player for most of 20 years,  joins opinion editor Jason Fields to discuss Vladimir Putin’s Russia and the dangers of its global influence. The title of his new book – Winter Is Coming – is a conscious play on the famous Game of Thrones TV and book series and the sense of darkness stalking the world.

from The Great Debate:

War College: Why is this 60-year-old U.S. warplane still flying?

January 12, 2016
PARTICIPANTS: Jason Fields, Matthew Gault, David Philipps

North Korea sets off a nuclear bomb and how does the U.S. respond? The Pentagon sends a 65-year-old airplane to buzz Korean airspace. It wouldn’t make a lot of sense if the warplane wasn’t the B-52 bomber. Designed in the aftermath of World War Two, obsolete nearly before the last one rolled off the line in 1961 – the Stratofortress may remain in the air for another 25 years.

from The Great Debate:

In North Korea, kids learn to love the bomb – and Minnie Mouse

January 8, 2016
PARTICIPANTS: Jason Fields, Matthew Gault, Jean H. Lee

North Korea is the most mysterious and oppressive regime on earth. Few journalists penetrate Pyongyang and fewer still stay long enough to understand the country and its people. Jean Lee is one of those determined few.