Warren's Feed
Nov 10, 2014

Iran and West end round of nuclear talks, outcome unclear

MUSCAT (Reuters) – Iran, the United States and the European Union ended two days of high-level talks on Tehran’s nuclear programme on Monday with no immediate sign they had bridged gaps ahead of a Nov. 24 deadline for an agreement.

A senior Iranian official told Reuters that minimal progress was made in the talks in Oman.

Nov 10, 2014

Iran, West hold unscheduled second day of nuclear talks

DUBAI (Reuters) – Iran, the United States and the European Union began an unscheduled second day of talks on Monday over disagreements blocking the resolution of a confrontation over Tehran’s nuclear programme, U.S. and Iranian officials said.

With two weeks to a deadline for an overall agreement, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and EU envoy Catherine Ashton met in Oman’s capital Muscat to tackle a decade-long dispute which has raised the risk of wider conflict in the Middle East.

Nov 9, 2014

Iran, U.S., EU hold nuclear talks in Oman, two weeks to deadline

MUSCAT (Reuters) – With only two weeks to a deadline for a breakthrough deal, senior envoys of Iran, the United States and European Union met in Oman on Sunday to try to advance efforts to defuse a standoff over Tehran’s nuclear program.

Western countries and close U.S. ally Israel suspect Iran has covertly sought to develop the means to build nuclear weapons, and a decade-long confrontation over the issue has raised the risk of a wider war in the volatile Middle East.

Nov 5, 2014

Iran nuclear deal harder after Nov. 24 – Kerry

PARIS (Reuters) – Reaching a nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers will be more difficult if negotiations drag beyond a November 24 deadline, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said on Wednesday.

Kerry, speaking ahead of his planned weekend talks with Iran’s foreign minister, said the United States and its allies were not – for now – weighing an extension of the negotiations.

Oct 28, 2014

Special Report: How Syria policy stalled under the ‘analyst in chief’

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – (In the Oct. 9 story, corrects size of Obama’s National Security Council staff in paragraph 12 from 370 to 270, after the White House clarified imprecise numbers it had provided to Reuters. Based on new figures provided after publication, the Council staff, excluding support personnel, has gone from about 50 under George H.W. Bush to 100 under Bill Clinton, 200 under George W. Bush and about 270 under Obama.)

Throughout 2012, as signs mounted that militants in Syria were growing stronger, the debate in the White House followed a pattern. In meeting after meeting, as officials from agencies outside the executive residence advocated arming pro-Western rebels or other forms of action, President Barack Obama’s closest White House aides bluntly delivered the president’s verdict: no.

Oct 28, 2014

How Syria policy stalled under the ‘analyst in chief’

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Throughout 2012, as signs mounted that militants in Syria were growing stronger, the debate in the White House followed a pattern. In meeting after meeting, as officials from agencies outside the executive residence advocated arming pro-Western rebels or other forms of action, President Barack Obama’s closest White House aides bluntly delivered the president’s verdict: no.

“It became clear from the people very close to the president that he had deep, deep reservations about intervening in Syria,” said Julianne Smith, who served as deputy national security advisor to Vice President Joe Biden. “And the likelihood of altering those views was low, very low.”

Oct 23, 2014

U.S. weighs passport, border changes in wake of Ottawa attack

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. officials are debating whether to tighten controls on the border with Canada and make it easier to revoke the passports of suspected militants, steps that could gain traction following two attacks in Canada this week.

The officials cautioned on Thursday that the discussions are in preliminary stages and that no immediate action appeared likely by either U.S. President Barack Obama’s administration or Congress.

Oct 21, 2014

Exclusive: Ex-spy chief’s private firm ends deal with U.S. official

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Former National Security Agency director Keith Alexander has ended a deal with a senior U.S. intelligence official allowing the official to work part-time for his firm, an arrangement current and former officials said risked a conflict of interest.

Reuters reported on Friday that the U.S. National Security Agency had launched an internal review of the arrangement between NSA Chief Technical Officer Patrick Dowd and IronNet Cybersecurity Inc, which is led by Alexander, his former boss.

Oct 17, 2014

Exclusive: NSA reviewing deal between official, ex-spy agency head

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. National Security Agency has launched an internal review of a senior official’s part-time work for a private venture started by former NSA director Keith Alexander that raises questions over the blurring of lines between government and business.

Under the arrangement, which was confirmed by Alexander and current intelligence officials, NSA’s Chief Technical Officer, Patrick Dowd, is allowed to work up to 20 hours a week at IronNet Cybersecurity Inc, the private firm led by Alexander, a retired Army general and his former boss.

Oct 9, 2014

Special Report: How Syria policy stalled under the ‘analyst in chief’

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Throughout 2012, as signs mounted that militants in Syria were growing stronger, the debate in the White House followed a pattern. In meeting after meeting, as officials from agencies outside the executive residence advocated arming pro-Western rebels or other forms of action, President Barack Obama’s closest White House aides bluntly delivered the president’s verdict: no.

“It became clear from the people very close to the president that he had deep, deep reservations about intervening in Syria,” said Julianne Smith, who served as deputy national security advisor to Vice President Joe Biden. “And the likelihood of altering those views was low, very low.”