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Feb 13, 2012
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IMF offers best way for China to save Europe

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By Wayne Arnold

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Beijing will almost certainly say it wants to see the euro zone survive at their joint summit on Feb. 14. If so, it should pony up – not by lending directly, but via the International Monetary Fund’s $1 trillion rescue package. That way China not only has a better chance of getting paid back, but may also win a bigger role at the world’s currency watchdog.

Feb 1, 2012
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Asia no refuge from U.S. slump for multinationals

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By Wayne Arnold

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

Asia may no longer offer multinationals a refuge from economic storms. Export-dependent Asia is succumbing to lackluster growth in developed markets, sapping a key source of growth for the likes of Caterpillar, DuPont and UPS.

Jan 31, 2012

Asian borrowers squeezed by foreign pullback

(The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions
expressed are his own)

By Wayne Arnold

HONG KONG, Jan 30(Reuters Breakingviews) – Asian borrowers
are feeling the pinch. European, British and U.S. banks all cut
credit to the region in the third quarter, helping pull $87
billion from the region. That left Asian corporate borrowing
costs at their highest since mid-2009. And Asia might not be
able to count on another influx of cheap U.S. dollars, as it did
then, to reverse risk aversion.

Jan 20, 2012
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Asian rally ignores looming risks to growth

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By Wayne Arnold

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Asian stocks are rallying on what may prove a pipe dream. Investors expect weakening exports and receding global credit to make for tough going in the first half, but are betting governments will unleash spending and rate cuts in the second half to offset it. The vagaries of politics make that a risky trade. Stocks are cheap for good reason.

Jan 18, 2012
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Samsung’s $41 bln binge may shake Apple’s tree

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By Wayne Arnold
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own

Samsung’s $41 billion investment splurge should ring alarm bells at its competitors. At least half of the Korean conglomerate’s planned outlays will probably go to expanding its global lead in smartphones and the chips and screens that drive them. It’s a bold bet in a slowdown, if its bet pays off Samsung could lengthen its lead over the likes of Apple.

Jan 18, 2012

Samsung’s $41 bln binge may shake Apple’s tree

(The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions
expressed are his own)

By Wayne Arnold

HONG KONG, Jan 18 (Reuters Breakingviews) – Samsung’s
(005930.KS: Quote, Profile, Research) $41 billion investment splurge should ring alarm
bells at its competitors. At least half of the Korean
conglomerate’s planned outlays will probably go to expanding its
global lead in smartphones and the chips and screens that drive
them. It’s a bold bet in a slowdown, if its bet pays off Samsung
could lengthen its lead over the likes of Apple (AAPL.O: Quote, Profile, Research).

Jan 10, 2012
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Taiwan voters should focus on growth, not China

By Wayne Arnold
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own 

Taiwan’s economy should be the winner if the ruling party clinches this weekend’s presidential and legislative elections. A big issue is how fast the island should build trade and financial ties with China. President Ma Ying-jeou wants to go full steam ahead; the opposition would ease the pace. But growth is the more immediate issue. Ma’s party, the Kuomintang, is more likely than his rivals to give Taiwan’s flagging economy the jolt of fiscal stimulus it needs.

Jan 4, 2012
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Korean spending spree sets right tone

By Wayne Arnold
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

South Korea’s spending spree looks wise. The government plans to spend 70 percent of its budget in the first half of 2012, and will likely throw in an additional Keynesian deficit-spending package. With presidential elections in December, that might seem a sop to voters. But Korea can afford it. And it has so far resisted the less sensible course of weakening the won to boost exports. The rest of Asia should follow its lead.

Dec 30, 2011
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Stock up on gold, tinned food and shotgun shells

By Wayne Arnold
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Hard times bolster the case for hard assets. Printing money to generate growth provides a tempting way out. But that undermines the value of financial assets, and civilisations that depend on workable means of monetary exchange. Servicing sky-high national borrowing without raising taxes, cutting benefits or deepening unemployment is a political nightmare. And while social pressure could undermine financial systems, seized-up finance could send societies into a new dark age. Gold, canned food and shotgun shells may be the safest bets in 2012.

Dec 29, 2011
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China could be North Korea’s ally of last resort

By Wayne Arnold
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Conventional thinking has it that South Korea will one day absorb its impoverished cousin. But if the North collapses, it could be Beijing that has more interest in propping it back up. Like bailing out a bank, doing so would require China to inject liquidity and capital in return for more accountable management in Pyongyang.

    • About Wayne

      "Wayne Arnold is Breakingviews’ Hong Kong based Asia strategist, with 20 years of experience in the region. From 1999 to 2008, he served as the Southeast Asia business and finance correspondent for The New York Times and the International Herald Tribune. In 2008 he helped launch a new daily newspaper in Abu Dhabi, The National, where as its economics columnist, he chronicled Dubai’s financial meltdown. He was previously a columnist and reporter at the Wall Street Journal in Hong Kong and Bloomberg in Tokyo. His stories have spanned from Japan’s financial collapse in 1991 to the global economic crisis. ..."
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