William's Feed
May 27, 2011

Yemen gives wounded al Qaeda a chance to regroup

LONDON (Reuters) – War in Yemen would hand al Qaeda’s boldest militants greater scope to attack the West and repair the group’s morale after the loss of Osama bin Laden.

With President Ali Abdullah Saleh’s government mired in worsening political strife, the Yemen-based al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) is likely to have more freedom to apply a proven talent for daring and inventive bombing plots.

May 24, 2011
via FaithWorld

Beyond bin Laden – Britain’s fight against violent Islamist radicalism

Photo

(Muslims hold placards as they march towards the U.S. embassy in London May 6, 2011/Suzanne Plunkett)

In a community centre in the British Midlands, 12 teenage boys — all of south Asian descent — watch intently as Jahan Mahmood unzips a canvas bag and pulls out the dark, angular shape of a World War Two machine gun. He unfolds the tripod, places the unloaded weapon on a table and pulls back the cocking handle. The boys crane forward. Mahmood pulls the trigger; a sharp snap rings out.

May 20, 2011

Loss of bin Laden adds to al Qaeda money woes

LONDON (Reuters) – Deprived of Osama bin Laden’s fundraising starpower, al Qaeda’s commanders face the prospect of a cash crunch that would complicate the task of evading capture by their U.S. pursuers.

The likely successor to Osama bin Laden is Ayman al-Zawahri, an Egyptian who lacks the former Saudi-born figurehead’s depth of contacts among potential donors in the Gulf, a region seen in the West as an important funding source for militant groups.

May 20, 2011

Analysis: Loss of bin Laden adds to al Qaeda money woes

LONDON (Reuters) – Deprived of Osama bin Laden’s fundraising starpower, al Qaeda’s commanders face the prospect of a cash crunch that would complicate the task of evading capture by their U.S. pursuers.

The likely successor to Osama bin Laden is Ayman al-Zawahri, an Egyptian who lacks the former Saudi-born figurehead’s depth of contacts among potential donors in the Gulf, a region seen in the West as an important funding source for militant groups.

May 9, 2011

Intelligence find may reveal bin Laden’s true role

LONDON (Reuters) – Al Qaeda documents captured in the raid that killed Osama bin Laden will give Western intelligence a clearer idea of the threat he posed, and may help settle the latest bad-tempered spat between Washington and Islamabad.

There was derision in Pakistan on Sunday at a suggestion by an unnamed U.S. official that bin Laden’s Abbottabad compound was an “active command and control centre” for al Qaeda. One senior Pakistan security official dismissed that as nonsense.

May 9, 2011

Analysis: Intelligence find may reveal bin Laden’s true role

LONDON (Reuters) – Al Qaeda documents captured in the raid that killed Osama bin Laden will give Western intelligence a clearer idea of the threat he posed, and may help settle the latest bad-tempered spat between Washington and Islamabad.

There was derision in Pakistan Sunday at a suggestion by an unnamed U.S. official that bin Laden’s Abbottabad compound was an “active command and control center” for al Qaeda. One senior Pakistan security official dismissed that as nonsense.

May 6, 2011

Snap analysis: Qaeda signals it lives to fight another day

LONDON (Reuters) – An al Qaeda message confirming Osama bin Laden’s death is intended to show a globally-scattered following that the group has survived as a functioning network.

The group’s commanders will hope the rapidity of their reaction just five days after bin Laden was killed will inspire affiliates to attack the West. Al Qaeda’s core leaders, believed hiding in the Afghan-Pakistan border region, normally take weeks or months to react to events in the outside world.

May 6, 2011

Analysis – Qaeda signals it lives to fight another day

LONDON (Reuters) – An al Qaeda message confirming Osama bin Laden’s death is intended to show a globally-scattered following that the group has survived as a functioning network.

The group’s commanders will hope the rapidity of their reaction just five days after bin Laden was killed will inspire affiliates to attack the West. Al Qaeda’s core leaders, believed hiding in the Afghan-Pakistan border region, normally take weeks or months to react to events in the outside world.

May 6, 2011

Qaeda signals it lives to fight another day

LONDON (Reuters) – An al Qaeda message confirming Osama bin Laden’s death is intended to show a globally-scattered following that the group has survived as a functioning network.

The group’s commanders will hope the rapidity of their reaction just five days after bin Laden was killed will inspire affiliates to attack the West. Al Qaeda’s core leaders, believed hiding in the Afghan-Pakistan border region, normally take weeks or months to react to events in the outside world.

May 4, 2011

Loyalty bin Laden inspired leaves lasting risk

LONDON (Reuters) – One day in Afghanistan in the late 1990s Osama bin Laden gathered several of his sons and told them he had pinned up a note at a mosque seeking volunteers to be suicide bombers.

With anticipation “shining in his eyes,” one of the sons later wrote, he seemed to be suggesting his children should add their own names to the list of the willing.