William's Feed
Mar 1, 2013

Exclusive: Chinese trader accused of busting Iran missile embargo

By William Maclean and Ben Blanchard

(Reuters) – A Chinese businessman indicted in the United States over sales of missile parts to Iran is still making millions of dollars from the trade, say security officials who monitor compliance with Western and U.N. sanctions.

These officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the businessman, Li Fangwei, has earned at least $10 million from illegal sales to Iran since his indictment by the New York County District Attorney in 2009.

Feb 17, 2013

Analysis: Rise of Islamists frays strategic UAE-Egyptian relations

DUBAI (Reuters) – Days before his overthrow, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak received a senior visitor from the United Arab Emirates (UAE), one of several Gulf monarchies long supportive of the most Arab populous country and its veteran strongman.

What transpired between Mubarak and Foreign Minister Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed al-Nahayan is not known, beyond the fact that a letter from UAE ruler Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed al-Nahayan was delivered.

Sep 18, 2012

UK spy agency tests Britons’ cyber skills

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s largest spy service, losing cyber specialists to better-paying private employers, unveiled an online security competition open to all Britons on Wednesday to identify future espionage recruits and raise awareness of cyber attacks.

The Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) said those aged 16 or over and not already working in cyber security could apply to test their ability to guard a computer network but only 150 contestants at most would be eventually allowed to compete.

Aug 2, 2012

Analysis: Syrian army faces tough battle in Aleppo

LONDON (Reuters) – The Syrian army’s brisk recapture of parts of Damascus is unlikely to be repeated in Aleppo, where open rebel supply lines, hard-to-assail narrow streets and an apparent lack of elite manpower will limit its commanders’ options.

The struggle in parts of Aleppo held by insurgents is likely to be more protracted than last month’s battles in the capital, inflicting further bloodshed and damage on Syria’s largest city and driving more of the population out, analysts say.

Jul 13, 2012

Wary of rebels and chaos, Syria moves chemical weapons

LONDON, July 13 (Reuters) – Syria appears to be quietly
shifting some chemical weapons from storage sites, say Western
and Israeli officials, but it is not clear whether the operation
is merely a security precaution amid the chaos of war, or
something more.

Some analysts see the move as serving a dual purpose – to
keep the weapons from capture by an expanding insurgency, and to
deprive Syria’s Western foes of any excuse for intervention on
the grounds of securing dangerous material gone astray.

Jul 11, 2012

Djibouti: Western bases pose manageable risk

LONDON (Reuters) – Host to the most important U.S. and French military bases in Africa, the tiny Red Sea state of Djibouti agrees it faces a risk of retaliation from the Islamist militants its Western guests hunt on forays into nearby countries.

But it argues the menace is limited.

Instead, the strategically placed country points to what it suggests is a more significant, long-term security consideration: the poverty, unemployment and regional political instability it sees as potential pathways to extremist thinking.

Jul 5, 2012

Insight: Local wars blur al Qaeda’s threat to West

LONDON (Reuters) – Osama bin Laden would not have approved.

Spinoff groups from al Qaeda have become increasingly engrossed in insurgencies in Africa and the Middle East, inflicting death and mayhem on local communities. But this emphasis on the pursuit of the enemy nearby has cast doubt on their commitment, in practice, to bin Laden’s war on the “far enemy” – the West and the United States in particular.

More than a year after U.S. forces killed bin Laden, some groups such as the Yemeni-based Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) undoubtedly remain a menace to the West.

Jul 5, 2012

Local wars blur al Qaeda’s threat to West

LONDON, July 5 (Reuters) – Osama bin Laden would not have
approved.

Spinoff groups from al Qaeda have become increasingly
engrossed in insurgencies in Africa and the Middle East,
inflicting death and mayhem on local communities. But this
emphasis on the pursuit of the enemy nearby has cast doubt on
their commitment, in practice, to bin Laden’s war on the “far
enemy” – the West and the United States in particular.

More than a year after U.S. forces killed bin Laden, some
groups such as the Yemeni-based Al Qaeda in the Arabian
Peninsula (AQAP) undoubtedly remain a menace to the West.

Jun 26, 2012
via FaithWorld

Egypt election result stirs joy among Islamists, doubts in the Gulf and Israel

Photo

(Supporters of Muslim Brotherhood's President-elect Mohamed Mursi hold a poster with his image as they celebrate his victory in the presidential election and shout anti-military council slogans, at Tahrir square in Cairo June 25, 2012. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh)

Egypt’s new president may lack real foreign policy clout for now, but the mere fact that a Muslim Brotherhood man is at the helm of the biggest Arab nation will embolden fellow Islamists seeking revolutionary change around the Middle East.

Jun 25, 2012

Egypt stirs Islamist joy, Gulf, Israeli doubts

LONDON (Reuters) – Egypt’s new president may lack real foreign policy clout for now, but the mere fact that a Muslim Brotherhood man is at the helm of the biggest Arab nation will embolden fellow Islamists seeking revolutionary change around the Middle East.

Mohamed Mursi’s tenure as head of state is likely to unsettle Israel, please the Jewish state’s arch-foe Iran, and dismay secularist critics of the Brotherhood at home and abroad who argue that political Islam is no antidote to unemployment, a flatlining economy and social misery, analysts say.