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Aug 1, 2014
via Photographers' Blog

Special delivery in Florida

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Florida Keys, United States
By Wolfgang Rattay

I was pretty much tired of looking at thousands of soccer pictures every day at our Miami office where we edited the Brazil 2014 World Cup.

I had to be cured from a fan picture allergy I contracted during four weeks of looking at pictures of all kinds of fans from all over the world, most of them with their mouth wide open, showing their teeth to me like I was a dentist.

Jan 8, 2014

German court dismisses case against Nazi guard over lost evidence

HAGEN, Germany (Reuters) – A German court dismissed a case on Wednesday against a 92-year-old man accused of killing a Dutch resistance fighter in World War Two when he was in Hitler’s elite Waffen SS, citing lost evidence.

At the end of one of Germany’s last Nazi war crimes trials, the judge in the court in the western city of Hagen said the case had to be dropped because too much evidence had been lost in the seven decades since the event.

Jun 8, 2013
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One week in the life of a photojournalist

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Deggendorf, Germany

By Wolfgang Rattay

Being a news photographer and a senior photo editor is never boring. The past seven days will, I think, impressively explain what I am talking about.

Last Saturday I went to Munich to edit Germany’s soccer cup final (the DFB Pokal). I finished at midnight after looking at some 3,000 files of which about 60 images hit our services following Bayern Munich’s historic “Treble” – victory in the Champions League, the national soccer championships and the Cup.

Jul 18, 2012
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Robo-cams take an Olympic dive

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By Wolfgang Rattay

Reuters robotic cameras will not only be hung high up at the Olympics venues but will also go underwater.

We have developed a remote-controlled “underwater photographer” that can hold its breath for the duration of the Olympic Aquatic competitions at the London 2012 Olympic Games.

Jun 28, 2012
via Photographers' Blog

Editing the Euro 2012

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By Wolfgang Rattay

If you’re really interested in understanding how we at Reuters work as a team across Europe to make sure that the right pictures from the Euro 2012 soccer championships arrive in time at hundreds of online sites and the next day in the papers, read this insight. You will understand that everyone in the team is an important cog in the machine and that not everything is someone sitting in the right corner of the pitch and triggering the camera’s shutter. If you read until the end, you will be rewarded with Amanda’s secret “spell-checker” recipe. It’s worth it — but only if you don’t have any health issues with your stomach.

SLIDESHOW: BEST OF EURO 2012

At each game we have five photographers assigned to cover the match. Four are seated, preferably, in each far corner of the pitch near the corner pole and the fifth shooter has an elevated position in the middle of the tribune – more or less at the same position as the main TV cameras. The ‘tribune photographer” shoots with three cameras. Two cameras are equipped with a 70-200mm zoom lens and aimed at both penalty boxes to make sure we have the image that tells the story of the game. This can be a goal, a penalty or a disallowed goal like in the England-Croatia match. The third camera is hand-held with either a four, five or six-hundred mm lens to shoot clear action (with green grass and no advertising boards), reactions of coached players and what ever else happens on the pitch.

Jul 9, 2010
via Photographers' Blog

How a simple tentacle became a media star

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Sometimes I hold seminars about journalism – photo journalism in particular of course. Most of the time I start talking about the journalistic rule number one.

What is rule number one? Journalism works very simply. When a dog bites a man – this is not a story. Dogs bite men. Unless the man is Prince Charles or the President of the United States, nobody is interested. But the opposite case – when a man bites a dog – that’s a story. The story will be even bigger if the man who bites the dog is the U.S. President and the dog belongs to Prince Charles.