The best of You Witness

January 18, 2008

Corinne Perkins and colleagues blog about the photos you’ve submitted that made her sit up and take notice.

Portrait of Barack Obama

Simple, clean, well-composed and telling. What else is left to say of this beautiful portrait of Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama by Michael Millhollin. What are your thoughts on this image or any of the other images in our best of the week You Witness slideshow?

Comments

My thoughts are that he shouldn’t look so sad. Obama actually won in Nevada. The primaries are about delegates for the convention and he beat Hillary on delegates 13 to 12! So to say she won is not really true. It is delegates you take to the convention, not a popular vote beauty contest that counts! I’m sick of the news agencies being pack reporteres and not being real journalists and searching for truths such as this and reporting them up front! This photo makes him look like a loser and he is far from that but you can’t tell it from the slanted press reports today.

Posted by Chip Croft | Report as abusive
 

Chip:

This image is meant to represent Obama in a dream state, dreaming of the American Dream, becoming the next President of the United States. Not the sad loser you seem to see.

This image was shot during a round table discussion in Reno, NV where he was listening to the sad stories of citizens dealing with the current economy. Maybe there is sadness in his eyes, but not because he’s a loser. If anything, he’s already a winner, as he has encouraged more people to participate in the recent caucuses and primaries than any other candidate has, probably ever. That, in my book, represents a great leader. And if, by chance, he is not chosen by the Democratic party as their nominee this time around, he is young enough to make another run at it in the future. Let’s face it, it is inevitable for a person of color to make it to Pennsylvania Ave. Why not now.

 

An excellent photo. These campaigns are exhausting and most of the time candidates appear un-naturally plastic or formed.

In this photo, the fatigue is there. I like the wrinkles and still the eyes are alert – a nice summary of where he must be right now.

Posted by Kevin | Report as abusive
 

What’s amazing in this photo is that Obama did not have any mask to fall from his face when in a state of absent mindedness. Most politicians forget for at least a very short lapse of time that they are in the public and show a frowning bored face. Obama here seems to be loving what he is doing; he is sincere.

 

He just looks sincere. How wonderful it be to have sincere representation in Washington DC.

Posted by Deb | Report as abusive
 

He looks bored like in a classroom. Yes, he is not Presidential looking, nor is he Presidential talking.

He lost me when he would say he would go up to leaders without other people fielding what the questions may be, what the other country may want, how could we deliver if they requested something. It would pretty poor if he said I have to go ask my mommie. He does not even respect the high office he is seeking. He really has a lot to learn. We do not have a time for a learner. Mistakes, or boneheads as he calls them can be a fatal mistake for our county.

No Commander of any troops goes to the front line before his or her men and women to check everytihing out. What is he thinkilng/?
Hillary Clinton immediately told us what she would do, 99.9% agreed with her. She knew what to do. Experience in anything is better. The first time is usually not your best.

Hillary Clinton gives everyone confidence and security, something our nation has not had since 1/2000.

Posted by J Daniels | Report as abusive
 

“Why is everything in this country so darn complicated”

Posted by Lynn | Report as abusive
 

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